Influenza Season Week 24 ending June 20, 2009

27 06 2009

2008-2009 Influenza Season Week 24 ending June 20, 2009

During week 24 (June 14-20, 2009), influenza activity decreased in the United States, however, there were still higher levels of influenza-like illness than is normal for this time of year.

  • Three thousand two hundred eighty-six (41.9%) specimens tested by U.S. World Health Organization (WHO) and National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS) collaborating laboratories and reported to CDC/Influenza Division were positive for influenza.
  • Over 99% of all subtyped influenza A viruses being reported to CDC were pandemic influenza A (H1N1) viruses.
  • The proportion of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) was below the epidemic threshold.
  • Five influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported and four of the five deaths were associated with pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection.
  • The proportion of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) was below the national baseline. Two of the 10 surveillance regions reported ILI above their region-specific baseline.
  • Twelve states reported geographically widespread influenza activity, seven states reported regional influenza activity, the District of Columbia and 11 states reported local influenza activity, and Puerto Rico and 20 states reported sporadic influenza activity.

U.S. Virologic Surveillance:

WHO and NREVSS collaborating laboratories located in all 50 states and Washington D.C. report to CDC the number of respiratory specimens tested for influenza.

During the 2008-09 season, influenza A (H1), A (H3), and B viruses have co-circulated in the United States. On April 15 and 17, 2009, CDC confirmed the first two cases of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus in the United States. As of June 26, 2009, 27,717 confirmed and probable infections with pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus and 127 deaths (33 deaths in individuals less than 25 years, 89 deaths in adults 25 years of age older, and five deaths with unknown age) have been identified by CDC and state and local public health departments. Reporting of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) viruses by U.S. WHO collaborating laboratories began during week 17 (week ending May 2, 2009). The results of tests performed during the current week are summarized in the table below.

During week 24, seasonal influenza A (H1), A (H3), and B viruses co-circulated at low levels with pandemic influenza A (H1N1) viruses. Over 99% of all subtyped influenza A viruses being reported to CDC this week were pandemic influenza A (H1N1) viruses.

The increase in the percentage of specimens testing positive for influenza by WHO and NREVSS collaborating laboratories may be due in part to changes in testing practices by health care providers, triaging of specimens by public health laboratories, an increase in the number of specimens collected from outbreaks, and other factors.





Influenza Statistis from the CDC

18 05 2009

CDC H1N1 Flu Update: U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection
Novel Influenza A (H1N1)
Cases by HHS Joint Field Office Coordination Groups

Novel H1N1 Flu Situation Update

May 18, 2009, 11:00 AM ET

Table. U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection

(As of May 18, 2009, 11:00 AM ET)
States* Confirmed and
Probable Cases
Deaths
Alabama
61 cases
0 deaths
Arkansas
3 cases
0 deaths
Arizona
476 cases
1 death
California
553 cases
0 deaths
Colorado
56 cases
0 deaths
Connecticut
53 cases
0 deaths
Delaware
65 cases
0 deaths
Florida
101 cases
0 deaths
Georgia
24 cases
0 deaths
Hawaii
21 cases
0 deaths
Idaho
8 cases
0 deaths
Illinois
696 cases
0 deaths
Indiana
81 cases
0 deaths
Iowa
66 cases
0 deaths
Kansas
34 cases
0 deaths
Kentucky**
14 cases
0 deaths
Louisiana
57 cases
0 deaths
Maine
12 cases
0 deaths
Maryland
34 cases
0 deaths
Massachusetts
143 cases
0 deaths
Michigan
158 cases
0 deaths
Minnesota
38 cases
0 deaths
Mississippi
3 cases
0 deaths
Missouri
19 cases
0 deaths
Montana
4 cases
0 deaths
Nebraska
28 cases
0 deaths
Nevada
30 cases
0 deaths
New Hampshire
19 cases
0 deaths
New Jersey
15 cases
0 deaths
New Mexico
68 cases
0 deaths
New York
254 cases
0 deaths
North Carolina
12 cases
0 deaths
North Dakota
3 cases
0 deaths
Ohio
13 cases
0 deaths
Oklahoma
32 cases
0 deaths
Oregon
94 cases
0 deaths
Pennsylvania
56 cases
0 deaths
Rhode Island
8 cases
0 deaths
South Carolina
36 cases
0 deaths
South Dakota
4 cases
0 deaths
Tennessee
82 cases
0 deaths
Texas
556 cases
3 deaths
Utah
91 cases
0 deaths
Vermont
1 cases
0 deaths
Virginia
21 cases
0 deaths
Washington
294 cases
1 death
Washington, D.C.
13 cases
0 deaths
Wisconsin
613 cases
0 deaths
TOTAL*(48)
5,123 cases
5 deaths

*includes the District of Columbia

**one case is resident of KY but currently hospitalized in GA.

This table will be updated daily Monday-Friday at around 11 AM ET.

International Human Cases of Swine Flu Infection

See: World Health Organization.

NOTE: Because of daily reporting deadlines, the state totals reported by CDC may not always be consistent with those reported by state health departments. If there is a discrepancy between these two counts, data from the state health departments should be used as the most accurate number.

~

To help put the flu season in perspective, the following chart from the CDC shows all cases of the flu that have occurred. As you can see, the Swine flu is only a small part of all the cases of flu that have occurred in the U.S.A

click on image to link to data

Link to larger view of chart

Synopsis:

During week 18 (May 3 – 9, 2009), influenza activity remained at approximately the same level as last week in the United States, indicating that there are higher levels of influenza-like illness than is normal for this time of year.

  • One thousand four hundred fifty-four (11.9%) specimens tested by U.S. World Health Organization (WHO) and National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS) collaborating laboratories and reported to CDC/Influenza Division were positive for influenza.
  • The proportion of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) was below the epidemic threshold.
  • Three influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported.
  • The proportion of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) was above the national baseline. Three of the ten surveillance regions reported ILI above their region-specific baselines.
  • Eight states reported geographically widespread influenza activity, 14 states reported regional activity, the District of Columbia and 15 states reported local influenza activity; and 13 states reported sporadic influenza activity.